Oculus Connect Reflections

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As we return to reality from the transcendent spiritual experience that was Oculus Connect and push forward with unprecedented determination, I'd like to take some time to speak candidly about the takeaways and implications of some of our experiences at OC. Let me begin by expressing how amazed I was by the openness and humility of the attendees. Everyone was approachable as equals, whether you were chatting with a small indie developer from Minnesota, a lead programmer from Epic, or even Palmer Luckey himself. There was no ego, no posturing, no puffed-up chests at this conference. I am encouraged by this and hope that the spirit of cooperation and mutual respect carries on as the community inevitably grows.

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On a tangentially related note, there was definitely not enough time to interact with all of the wonderful people there. I managed to extinguish an entire box of business cards, but the sentiment remains true. The back-to-back schedule of super-relevant content (plus liveblog duties) had us running from one talk to the next without a moment to breathe. Maybe all of the positive reception will convince Oculus to extend next year's event one more day.

Regardless of the brevity of the entire whirlwind Virtual Reality love-fest that was OC, Oculus (and Facebook) put on one hell of a show. This was a top notch production and I commend all of the event organizers for putting together a buttery smooth, premium experience. Seriously pulled out all the stops.

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Then there was the tech. I can't even begin to do this justice without transcribing the keynotes and panels in their entirety. Listening to Michael Abrash speak about how the precise confluence of specific audio-visual inputs can override even a conscious rejection of a simulatory experience to the point where you have NO CHOICE but to believe it is real - talk about a coming revolution! We were also privy to demoing Crescent Bay, the latest and greatest prototype VR HMD from Oculus. I saw the future and I was grinning like a dunce in witness of it. To illustrate how incredible this prototype was, during the final demo there was a slow-motion car explosion that propelled debris directly at your face. I closed my mouth because I didn't want to eat glass. Think about that.

Speaking of which, you know the extremely rational 0.2% of doubt you reserve for just about anything in life? The keynotes and Crescent Bay seriously annihilated with extreme vengeance the remaining specks of uncertainty I had about vast mainstream adoption of this technology; it's going to happen and it'll be fast.